Archive for the ‘Space’ Category

Another week and another successful Science club meeting – well, almost…..


As the year 7 and 8 science enthusiasts began to get to grips with some rocket building, a small glitch almost spelt disaster for the meeting!

Instead of building some mini-rockets, the girls got to begin thinking about how best to design their rockets, and discuss the best way to test them.

Should we aim for the highest rocket launch? Or the greatest distance travelled? Or should we aim to launch our rockets as fast as possible?


These are all factors the girls came up with to investigate, and we will be looking at investigating them all in next weeks club! So if you couldn’t make it today, make sure you come along for some rocket building next Thursday! 12.45pm in Science 5 🙂

Miss Gilleece 🙂

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On 4th July students and staff took part in the 24 Hour Water Rocket Challenge, a World Record attempt. Organised by the University of Central Lancashire and NASA, the aim is to have as many water rockets launched around the world in a 24 hour period.

Water rockets are really simple to make – they’re just 2L bottles with some water and high pressure air, but the result is amazing. Taking off at speeds of around 90mph, experiencing forces 60 time greater than gravity and reaching heights of at least 45m, they’re a great way to experience forces and momentum in action.

We were lucky enough to have two witnesses from local business Cotswold Camping (thanks Jim and Ant) and managed to achieve 16 separate launches over lunchtime. I’ll update this post when I hear if the World Record was beaten, but it’ll take a while for the organisers to count and verify all the results.

Thanks to all those that took part or came and watched.

Read more at the St Albans Review newsite

A water rocket blasts off from Space Station Loreto! (photo from St Albans Review – thanks!)

Is there anybody out there?

Posted: February 26, 2012 by Mr Pimentao in Biology, Space
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Forget about little green men, ET or Alien – they don’t exist. Or at least we don’t have any proof that they do. Despite this, the search for extra terrestrial life is now as lively as ever : from the discoveries of planets orbiting other stars in our galaxy to the SETI (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence) project, scientists are scrambling to find a glimpse of life away from our own home planet.

Exoplanets and the Goldilocks principle

Exoplanets are planets that orbit stars other than the Sun. For decades astronomers had suspected that other stars in our galaxy might have planets orbiting them ( just like the Sun has Mercury , Venus, Earth, and so on… ) Like all the other scientific predictions, you can only confirm it if you have enough evidence to back it up. Guess what – for the last ten years or so, astronomers have found evidence that in fact there are planets orbiting stars in our galaxy.

Planet in transit across the star disc: Picture: ESO/L. Calçada

The problem with seeing planets orbiting stars so far away from us is that the brightness of the star outshines the tiny amount of light reflected by the planet. Only very recently , with developments in image processing software and improvements in CCD technology have scientists been able to detect planets. But this doesn’t even mean that we can actually “see” the planets – we can’t , at least not directly. We must look for clues in how the light from these stars reaches us.

One way of telling if a star has planets orbiting it is called the “Planetary transit” method.   Whenever a planet is placed between us and the star, we can detect a small decrease in the brightness of the star. Imagine a mosquito flying in front of a lamp – whenever it flies between us and the lamp, we can see that the lamp seems to get dimmer because the mosquito blocks a tiny bit of its light.  The same happens with a planet that orbits around a far away star. Every so often the planet blocks some of the star’s light and the star appears to have dimmed by a  little amount. Scientists look out for these tiny changes in the brightness of stars and use their data to compare the size of the planet with the size of the star.

This is all fine, there are more planets in the Universe than those we have learnt about in Miss Gileece’s lesson…. My Very Easy Method Just Speeds Up Naming Planets… But is there life living on them? Do they have BBM?

The answer is….. we can’t tell if there is life on any of the exoplanets that were found, let alone whether or not they have BBM. One thing we know is that life as we know it has first appeared in liquid water –  right here on Earth, millions of years ago. So, we can be certain that planets where liquid water exists are more likely to have life.  The planets that obey this condition must be at the right distance from their star for the temperature to be just right for liquid water to exist. Depending on the kind of star , and on the size and composition of the planet, the temperature is just right for liquid water if the planet orbits the star at a range of distances often called “the Goldilocks region”.

This raises the question: how do we know if these exoplanets have liquid water? And if they do have liquid water does that definitely mean that they have some kind of life?  Life on Earth evolved in water , but there are so many variables to take into account that it is currently impossible to prove that there is indeed other life forms in the Universe.

So, if you were expecting a YES or NO answer to the question you may now be disappointed (or not!). All we can say is that most probably there is life somewhere in the Universe, possibly in a planet orbiting one of the hundreds of million stars in our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

Stargazing Evening

Posted: January 12, 2012 by Mr Bilton in Field Work, Physics, Space
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 Jupiter and Jupiter’s Moon Io by Robert Altenburg (left)

After postponing the 2012 Winter Loreto stargazing evening on Wednesday, we crossed our fingers for the weather to help us having a look at the Universe tonight.

Unfortunately the clouds appeared while the telescopes were being assembled – but they were not enough to stop us from zooming in at the night sky.

Those who joined the Science Department last night were able to see what Galileo Galilee saw when he first pointed his telescope at Jupiter, the “king” of the planets, along with its 4  moons, Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto .

Despite the cold, the brave Loreto girls and parents also learnt how to find Polaris (the North star), Betelgeuse and the Seven sisters.

The Loreto College stargazing evening was a success, and we hope we can count on more of you to come along next time.

Thanks to all those who came.

A big THANK YOU  to Setpoint Herts, Ms Ellis, Ms Hyslopp and Miss Vine for letting us borrow their binoculars and telescopes. Without them this would not have been possible.

The Sun Project

Posted: January 4, 2012 by Mr Pimentao in Engineering, Physics, Space
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We sometimes take things for granted. Things like the food on our plate, the air we breathe, the water running from our taps. All of these would not be there if it wasn’t for our star, the Sun.
The Sun Project is an Astronomy and Engineering club.

The pupils involved have been developing solar panels to heat up water, investigating solar cells and how they can be used to build toys, or observing the surface of the Sun. Everyone is welcome to join at any time.

 

Solar storm, October 2003

A Celebration of the Moon

Posted: January 4, 2012 by Mr Bilton in Gallery, Physics, Space
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The US Space Agency NASA has succeeded in placing a set of twin satellites in orbit around the moon. The satellites, called the Grail Twins, are set to map gravity variations across the surface of our nearest neighbour.

This will allow scientists to understand the formation of the moon in more detail, and even to test recent suggestions that Earth may once have had two moons.

So, to celebrate this here are some pictures showing different aspects of a very familiar face.

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